In the epigraph to Drown, Junot Diaz uses a quote from a Cuban poet, Gustavo Pérez Firmat—“The fact that I am writing to you in English already falsifies what I wanted to tell you.” This is the dilemma of the immigrant writer. If I’d lived in Haiti my whole life, I’d be writing these things in Creole. But these stories I am writing now are coming through me as a person who, though I travel to Haiti often, has lived in the U.S. for more than three decades now.

Often when you’re an immigrant writing in English, people think it’s primarily a commercial choice. But for many of us, it’s a choice that rises out of the circumstances of our lives. These are the tools I have at my disposal, based on my experiences. It’s a constant debate, not just in my community but in other communities as well. Where do you belong? You’re kind of one of us, but you now write in a different language. You’re told you don’t belong to American literature or you’re told you don’t belong to Haitian literature. Maybe there’s a place on the hyphen, as Julia Alvarez so brilliantly wrote in one of her essays. That middle generation, the people whose parents brought them to other countries as small children, or even people who were born to immigrant parents, maybe they can have their own literature too.

Anonymous: Where do Afro Palestinians fit in with the struggle? They also face racism from other Palestinians and are often not considered Palestinian enough nor that they have the right to be in the land despite many of them being in the country since the Islamic conquest. What is their position and who is rallying for their rights?

ard-al-burtuqal:

First, Afro-Palestinian have always fitted in the Palestinian anti-colonial struggle for national liberation they participate in resistance and mobilizations against the occupation. The first Palestinian woman to organize a commando operation in “israel” was Fatima Bernawi and she is Afro-Palestinian.I don’t know where you got that Afro-Palestinians “don’t have the right to be on the land” they are indigenous to the land just as any Palestinian. I suggest you look at these links to resources i provided below to learn more about the community and their struggles and aspirations. 

Video: Ali Jiddah Afro-Palestinian activist from Jerusalem 

Afro-Jerusalmite Society: An Afro-Palestinian organization based in Jerusalem 

Article: Black, Proud and Palestinian

Photo Portraits: Portraits of Afro-Palestinians from Jerusalem and Jericho 

Articles about Afro-Palestinians in Gaza:

Here & Here 

Darg Team Palestinian Hip-Hop group group from Gaza that is made up of Afro-Palestinian members (The second article above talks about them)

Reema Morgan Afro-Palestinian singer from Gaza

The crisis of solidarity: Using ‘’their plight” to score political points by Budour Hassan 

This is a great article although Budour discusses Eritrean and South Sudani refugees in “israel” she also writes about Afro-Palestinians.

You can read about Fatima Bernawi here beginning on page 10:

Daughters of Palestine Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement by Amal Kawar

Article about Majed Abu Maraheel the first Palestinian to compete in the Olympics back in Atlanta in 1996 who is Afro-Palestinian.

This.

newmodelminority:

prettyofcenter:

when you come to this blog please understand that it is sometimes like an installation art piece. i exhibit some deep intense feelings, let who ever is online at the time get a glimpse then i take it down. if you see it you were meant to see it and if you miss it there is more to come at another time. 

Word. Same.

Yes. Same x 2 + 100 for each space, each blog, each Tumblr, each IG post…

Census History, Hispanic, & Latina/o

lati-negros:

Logan’s (2003) study compares racial identification of Latina/os using Census data dated back to 1970. Based on his research, there has been a steady resistance to US racial categories. In 1980, Latina/os were much more likely to identify themselves as ‘White Hispanic.’ While this number has…

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